Caribbean Islands Hurricane Info

Caribbean Islands Hurricane Info

Officially, the Atlantic hurricane season is from 1 June to 30 November, but as the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) notes:

“There is nothing magical in these dates, and hurricanes have occurred outside of these six months, but these dates were selected to encompass
over 97% of tropical activity.”

When Is the Hurricane Season Most Active?
Again according to the AOML, there’s a “very peaked season from August to October”, with:

  • 78% of the tropical storm days
  • 87% of the “minor” hurricane days
  • 96% of the “major” hurricane days

And within this peak hurricane season, early to mid-September is the pinnacle.

Are some islands more “hurricane prone” than others?
Some islands are less prone to violent storms than others, and vacationers and honeymooners may try to pick spots strategically.

The Dutch Caribbean “ABC” islands — Aruba, Bonaire, and Curacao, are clustered close to Venezuela, and are often considered to be out of the main hurricane zone; Trinidad and Tobago, too, are south of the hurricane belt and rarely get hit.

Also, some say that the eastern Caribbean and US East Coast are most at risk mid-August to mid-September, whereas in the western Caribbean (which includes Mexico and Belize), the season intensifies from mid-September into early November. But Jamaica, in the western Caribbean, has mainly been hit late August-early September.

Unfortunately, Mother Nature isn’t reading any calendarsor maps.

Below are excerpts from some of the varous islands’ sites and weather sites:

 

ANGUILLA

The average yearly temperature in Anguilla is 80 degrees Fahrenheit, with only slight variations in the warmer or cooler periods. The island is relatively dry, with just 35 inches of annual rainfall. The rainy season in Anguilla occurs during the summer and fall hurricane months. Hurricane season in the Atlantic lasts from the beginning of June until the end of November, and these menacing Atlantic storm systems keep many travelers from visiting the region during this time. Anguilla, located in the north of the Leeward Islands, is subject to frequent Atlantic tropical storms and hurricanes.

Despite the threat of hurricanes and increased rainfall, the summer months can still be a pleasant time to visit the island. With its northern position in the Caribbean, trade winds keep the island’s summer temperatures mild and enjoyable. Summer can also be better for scuba divers, as water visibility is at its highest. The off season in the Caribbean, from the middle of April to the middle of December, does offer travelers significant savings on air travel and accommodations, with prices being slashed up to 50 percent. Crowds will decrease significantly during this time, meaning that travelers may find it easier to find that secluded beach or secure a dinner reservation. Travelers who decide to travel during this time period should keep a watchful eye on Atlantic storm developments prior to and during their trip.

Travelers should also be aware that many hotels and restaurants may curtail their hours or shut down for weeks or months at a time during this period. Recreation vendors may also limit their services. With the number of tourists on the island so low, many hotels will use the off season to conduct repairs and renovation of their properties. In order to avoid staying in a construction zone, travelers should check with hotels to determine what types of construction will be going on and how it is expected to impact visitors.

Hotels and restaurants that are under construction during this time period are readying themselves for the busy tourist season when these services will rise to meet the higher demand of travelers. Hotels and restaurants will be newly renovated and fully staffed to provide the highest quality of customer attention and care. The influx of vacationers and day trippers from St. Maarten will mean that recreation and adventure services will be running at full capacity. Because these winter months are so popular, flights and hotels are booked months in advance. This is especially true at the nicer resorts. Travelers looking to vacation in Anguilla during the tourist season should make their reservations far in advance. Since the island is known for its cuisine, restaurant reservations are essential even during the winter months.

Source: <http://anguilla-guide.info/planning.your.trip/when.to.go/>

ANTIGUA

Antigua’s hurricane season is June to September. Antigua and Barbuda is warm all year round with a soothing south-easterly breeze.

Source: http://www.antigua-barbuda.com/news_information/faqs.asp

Peak of the season (since 1944):

Most storms: week of 9/1-9/7 (4 since 1944 or 1 every 16.2 years)
Most hurricanes: week of 9/1-9/7 (3 since 1944 or 1 every 21.7 years)
Most severe hurricanes: week of 9/1-9/7 (3 since 1944 or 1 every 21.7 years)

 

Source:  Caribbean Hurricane Network

ST. LUCIA

Due to its location near the equator, St. Lucia does not have very well defined seasons. There is however a rainy season that generally falls between June and November. During this season, visitors should be prepared for heavy, but sporadic showers that come on quickly. Visitors should not worry about traveling during the rainy season as the showers may come about quickly, but blue skies are quick to follow.

St. Lucia is located in the hurricane belt and it is possible for severe tropical storms to arise. The hurricane season is generally during the same time as the rainy season, June through November. Visitors should be cautious, but not deterred from visiting St. Lucia during this season. With advanced meteorological technology, storm prediction and detection will help prepare visitors and locals on the island for any potential danger. Visitors can take measures to protect themselves by researching weather conditions before traveling to St. Lucia and prepare accordingly.

SOURCE: http://stlucia-guide.info/weather/

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This information is provided as a reference only and in no way infers or implies any weather conditions can be predicted or guaranteed.

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